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New Style MCK Black Logo 1w Letters

Sermons

The reason God came from nowhere by Dr. Shadrach Meshach Lockridge

Last modified on 2011-09-30 08:45:42 GMT. 0 comments. Top.

 

“The reason God came from nowhere, was there was nowhere for Him to come from. And coming from nowhere, He stood on nothing for there was nowhere for Him to stand. And standing on nothing, He reached out where there was nowhere to reach and caught something where there was nothing to catch, and hung something on nothing, and told it to stay there.”

MY KING IS: The King of the Jews – that’s a racial King. The King of Israel – that’s a national King; The King of Glory; the King of Kings and Lord of Lords. The heavens declare the glory of God, the firmament shows His handiwork.
My King is… A sovereign King. No means of measure can define His limitless Love! No far-reaching telescope can bring into visibility the coastline of His shortest supply! No barrier can hinder Him from pouring out His blessings!

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He’s enduringly strong!… He’s entirely sincere! He’s imperially powerful! He’s impartially merciful! He’s the greatest phenomenon that has ever crossed the horizon of this world!

He’s God’s Son… The sinner’s savior! The centerpiece of civilization! He stands in the solitude of Himself!

He’s august and unique!… He’s unparalleled! He’s unprecedented! He is the loftiest idea in literature. He’s the highest personality in philosophy. He’s the supreme problem in higher criticism. He’s the fundamental doctrine of true theology! He’s the core necessity for spiritual religion. He’s the miracle of the ages! He’s the superlative of everything good that you choose to call Him!

He’s the only one qualified to be an all-sufficient Savior!… He supplies strength for the weak. He’s available for the tempted and tried. He sympathizes and He saves. He strengthens and sustains. He guards and guides. He heals the sick. He cleansed the lepers. He forgives sinners. He discharges debtors. He delivers the captives. He defends the feeble. He blesses the young. He serves the unfortunate. He regards the aged. He rewards the diligent and beautifies the meek.

My King is the key to knowledge: The wellspring of wisdom; the doorway of deliverance; the pathway of peace; the roadway of righteousness; the highway of holiness, and the gateway of glory!

His office is manifold: His promise is sure. His light is matchless. His goodness is limitless. His mercy is everlasting. His reign is Righteous. His yoke is easy, and His burden is light.

I wish I could describe Him for you, but He’s indescribable! He’s Incomprehensible! He’s invincible! He’s Irresistible!

You can’t get Him out of your mind or off your hands! You can’t out-live Him and you can’t live without Him! The Pharisees couldn’t stand Him, but they found out they couldn’t stop Him. Pilate couldn’t find any fault in Him. The witnesses couldn’t agree. Herod couldn’t kill Him. Death couldn’t handle Him, and the grave couldn’t hold Him!

That’s my King, That’s my King, That’s my King, and He’s the kingdom and the power and the glory – Forever! AMEN!!! I wonder…do you know Him? – Rev. SM Lockridge

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Rev. Forrest E. Harris Sr. new President of American

Last modified on 2009-11-26 10:58:19 GMT. 0 comments. Top.

Rev Forrest E. Harris

Rev Forrest E. Harris

Dr. Forrest Elliott Harris, Sr.

Dr. Forrest E Harris, Sr. is the new President of American Baptist College in Nashville, Tennessee. In addition, he is the Director of the Kelly Miller Smith institute on African American Church Studies and Assistant Dean for African American Church Studies at Vanderbilt University Divinity School. As Assistant Professor for the Practice of Ministry at Vanderbilt, Dr. Harris teaches courses in the area of Church Community and the Theology of Ministry in the Black Church tradition.

Dr. Harris holds a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree from Knoxville College, a Bachelor of Theology (Th.B.) degree from American Baptist College, Master of Divinity (M. Div.) and Doctor of Ministry (D. Min.) degrees from Vanderbilt University Divinity School, where he was a Benjamin E Mays Fellow and recipient of the Florence Conwell prize for preaching.

Dr. Harris is the son of Mr. And Mrs. WT. and Sallie Mae Harris of Memphis, Tennessee. He has a twin brother, and seven other sisters and brothers.

From 1971 to 1979, Dr. Harris was a Federal Compliance Officer with the Energy and Research Development Administration, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. As a senior compliance officer, Dr. Harris received a Special Achievement Certificate Cash Award for negotiating a $1.2 million affected class remedy for minorities and females in the Southeast United States.

In 1975, Dr. Harris resigned his position with the federal government to respond to a call to prepare for the Christian preaching ministry. In the subsequent years ending in 1982, Dr. Harris commuted between Nashville and Oak Ridge to complete his seminary training.

While a seminary student at Vanderbilt, Dr. Harris pastored the Oak Valley Baptist Church, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. During his pastorate in Oak Ridge, Dr. Harris brought together several community organizations and founded the Oak Valley Development Corporation. He also served a three-year term as president of the Oak Ridge Branch of the NAACP. From 1985 to 1987, as an instructor at Roane State Community College, Dr. Harris initiated a Black Studies curriculum and coordinated social outreach programs and special events for Roane State.

Since 1988, Dr. Harris has been a member of the faculty and the Director of the Kelly Miller Smith Institute on the Black Church at Vanderbilt Divinity School, which now has a 1.2 million dollar endowment. Through the institute at Vanderbilt, and with grants from the Lilly Endowment and the Pew Charitable Trusts totaling over 1.3 million dollars, Dr. Harris coordinated a national ecumenical dialogue on “What Does It Mean to be Black and Christian?” Over 12,000 people participated in this national discussion resulting in the publication of two – What Does It Mean to be Black and Christian? Pulpit, Pew and Academy in Dialogue, Townsend Press, 1995; and What Does It Mean to Be Black and Christian? The Meaning of the African American Church

African American Church, Townsend Press, 1997. Also supported by foundation grants, Dr. Harris was instrumental in establishing a black church history and preservation project resulting in the establishment of a Black Church Historian Society in Nashville.

In addition to several journal articles, Dr. Harris also is the author of Ministry for Social Crisis: Theology and Praxis in the Black Church Tradition, Mercer University Press, 1993. Dr. Harris received a journalism prize, cash award from The Journal of Intergroup Relations, National Association of Human Rights Workers for his article, “South Africa Beyond Apartheid,” The Journal of Intergroup Relations, the National Association of Human Rights Workers, Fall 1993.

Under his pastorate at Pleasant Green Baptist Church, Nashville, Tennessee, Dr. Harris was instrumental in establishing a progressive social ministry program aimed at the transformation of the community. He established the first church based Community Development Corporation in Nashville (the Pleasant Green Community Development Corporation) and he is responsible for the establishment of an inter-religious and inter-racial organization of Nashville congregations into Tying Nashville Together. Dr. Harris previously served as president of the Interdenominational Ministers’ Fellowship (Nashville) for five years. Dr. Harris has served on the boards of the Nashville Center for Black Family Life, the State of Tennessee Citizen’s Commission on Tenn-Care, Opportunities Industrialization Center (01Q, and United Way of Middle Tennessee.

As a member of the Ecumenical Association of Third World Theologians, Dr. Harris traveled to Johannesburg, South Africa in 1993, and as a member of the Human Rights Commission, World Baptist Alliance, traveled to Hong Kong, China, Vancouver, Canada, and Duban, South Africa where he delivered papers on topics related to human rights, global and ethnic conflict.

Dr. Harris is a member of the 100 Black Men of Middle Tennessee, and life member of the NAACP. He is married to Jacqueline Borom Harris, and they have four children: Kara, a mechanical engineer, the Proctor and Gamble Company, Elliot, Jr., senior, University of Memphis; Morgan and Alexis, high school students.

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